Embodied music: dancing and the brain

In cooperation with Amsterdam Dance Event

19okt2017 17:00 - 18:30

Evenement

Scientific research has proven dancing and listening to music to have positive effects on the brain. How and why these effects occur are questions to be explored at SPUI25 during the Amsterdam Dance Event, so you can enjoy dancing on electronic music even more! With: Makiko Sadakata.

Listening to music and chemical processes in our brain cannot be separated from each other. Many researchers are trying to understand the influence of music on our brain. Important aspects in research are the music itself, modeling the melodies, trying to predict positive or negative responses of the audience and whether or not listening to music and enjoying it, is nature or nurture. In the light of the Amsterdam Dance Event researchers will be investigating the influence of house- and dance music on our brain on 19 and 20 October. The first edition answers the question: what happens in our brain when we dance to music? Moving bodies together with music has a lot of influences on how we behave, collaborate and interact. How does that work? Is dancing good for the brain? The perception of timbre and rhythm in Electronic Dance Music will also be discussed.

About the speaker

Makiko Sadakata is assistant professor at the University of Amsterdam, music department, cognitive artificial intelligence department and the institute for logic, language and computation. She holds a PhD from Nijmegen and an MA in Musicology from Kyoto City University of Arts. She has written extensively on the influence of music, both the influence on the brain of listening to Electronic Dance Music as, currently, a recent research project on embodies music cognition.

Location: SPUI25